Waxed Paper Negative – A Photo Essay :)

Tried something new for me. Made a salt print from a waxed paper negative. Bees wax!

Warm pan to melt the bees wax onto the paper negative.

Probably too much bees wax! 🙂

The goal of using the bees wax is to make the paper more translucent for printing through.

Looks good!  Can see light shining through the paper.

Ready to put the salt solution on another piece of paper with a glass coating rod.  This paper will be the positive print.

I added a contrast agent to the salt solution; the contrast agent makes it yellow.

The above photo was taken in our closet… our only closet… where I can get away from UV light (sunshine). The paper has been coated with silver nitrate and dried. Now I can add the waxed paper negative and sandwich it under glass in a printing frame.

Oh… and I needed to flip the negative so it will print correctly.

Ready to go outside!

In the evening sun to start the exposure. The yellow edges are already starting to turn brown from the UV light.

After 10 minutes the paper starts to show how it is reacting to the UV light by turning brown around the edges. The image area is still blank though. More time is needed.

Waiting… loving the beautiful summer weather… and the hollyhocks!

After 30 minutes it is looking close to done. Notice how dark the brown edges are now.

And Dash passes through…

Checking the progress of the exposure. My print frame has a hinged back so I can lift one half of the paper and not loose its registration/alignment. I check the exposure at the top of my basement stairs where the light is dim.

A little more time in the sun!

After a 40 minute exposure, the print is placed in water for 7 minutes for its first rinse cycle.

Still rinsing. 🙂

Now the print is in a fixing solution for 10 minutes to keep it from continuing to turn black.

In the final rinse which will take 30 minutes.

The rinse is done. Next, I dry it with a hair dryer.

It’s dry and signed!

I began the printing process with bees wax so….
why not add more bees wax?!!

The End!

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Portraits of my children…

These are the first 4×5 film portraits I have ever taken of my children.  It was so neat to pull the newly developed negatives from the tank and see my own kids!

The prints shown below are 4×5″ salted paper prints that I hand coated and exposed to the sun in my back yard.

Learning the salted paper print process has been so much fun.  And the final product is very difficult to fully capture in a digital image; they really need to be enjoyed in person where the texture and delicate range of tone can be experienced first hand.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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May 28th Farmers’ Market!

I’m excited to share these salted paper print gems and more at tomorrow’s farmers market. Stop by and learn about the historic salted paper process from 8-12 (as long at it stays dry).

 

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Hand coated photographic paper!

All of my historic process papers are hand coated.  This means that I paint one and sometimes two different solutions onto the surface of the paper.    The chemicals are sensitive to UV light rays so all of the work must be done either at night or in a darkened room.  Luckily, the chemicals I use can be coated with a light bulb or two turned on!

The photos below show my set-up for coating salted paper (brown prints) and cyanotype paper (blue prints).  The salted paper requires a brushed on coat of distilled water, let it dry for a couple of minutes, a coat of salt solution, let it dry for 30 minutes, and a coat of silver nitrate solution, and let it dry in a dark area for at least two hours.

The cyanotype solution is a fun neon yellow before it is exposed to ultra violet light.  The coating process for cyanotype prints  includes one brushed on coat of distilled water, let it dry for a couple minutes, a puddle pushed coat of cyanotype solution, and let it dry in a dark area for at least 2 hours.  A puddle pusher is a glass rod that is used to move the liquid solution across the paper.

I use a couple of places in my home for hand coating paper.  At night I can work just about anywhere.  During the day, I can do some of the work (cutting paper, distilled water coat and salt solution coat) anywhere,  but the light sensitive solutions require me to hide away in our only closet!  Yes, historic farm houses just do not have closets! 🙂

Hand coating a salted paper with silver nitrate. The silver nitrate is barely visible before it is exposed to light.
This photo shows my puddle pusher or glass rod used to move the light sensitive solution across the surface of my paper.
Cyanotype paper before it is exposed to uv light. An exposed sheet of cyanotype paper turns a beautiful rich blue!

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First Week of the Hillsdale County Farmers’ Market!

Join me at the Hillsdale County Farmer’s Market (Hillsdale Courthouse parking lot) for an authentic street portrait experience and for demonstrations of historic photographic printing processes.   I’ll also have handmade salted paper prints, cyanotypes, albumen prints and more available for purchase!

The market is held Saturdays, May 13th-September 2017 from 8 a.m.-12 p.m.

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Art Around Town May 5th, 5-7 pm at Smith’s Flower Shop

On “Cinco de Mayo” I will be at Smith’s Flower Shop from 5-7:00 pm to demonstrate how my Afghan Box Camera works.  If you’re curious stop by and take a look!  I’ll have some examples of other vintage print processes available to see too!

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